12 Tips to Avoid Summer Health Hazards

Summer health hazards are really common. Summer means outdoor activities, vacation, and great fun in the sun! It is a time when people hit the road to visit distant relatives, national parks, or the ocean. The long days and warm months mean that there is a lot of time for baseball games, barbecues, swimming, and clubbing.

But do not let the warm nights and sunny days fool you. Remember that summer season also holds significant water, weather, and summer health hazards. 

Summer Health Hazards to Avoid 

12 Tips to Avoid Summer Health Hazards

In this article, Your Health Tubers present you some tips that can help you avoid certain summer health hazards. So, here is how to prevent common summer problems, and of course, what to do if they strike.

  • Sunburns

Rule number one is summer is that you must always wear a good sunscreen. Moreover, you should avoid the strongest sun rays, especially during the middle of the day. Try wearing clothes that protect your legs and arms, and a hat that shields your ears, neck, and face. You should reapply sunscreen each 3 hours, or even more often if you swim or get sweaty. (Remember – there are no such things as waterproof sunscreens.) A tan is also sun damage!

  • Pool Risks

Do not mix drinking with fun around and in the water. You must avoid alcohol. It can affect your balance, judgment, and overall health. Teach your kids to swim and always watch them closely at the beach, or the pool.   

  • Your Feet Waited All Winter

Yeah, we actually get it:  it is too hot for some other shoes! However, if you can bend the flip-flop in half, it is too rickety to support your foot.  Remember – the ideal ones are sturdy and are made of some high-quality material (like leather).

Flip-flops can be perfect for the pool, the beach, and the locker room, where they could stomp out athlete’s foot (find more about this condition: LINK). But do not run, play sports, or walk long distances, in them. You can sprain an ankle.

  • Mowing Injuries

You simply wanted to cut the grass and those sharp blades move really fast! Thousands of people every year are hurt using lawn mowers.

  1. So, keep the mower in good repair. You should always shut it off before checking problems.
  2. Do not use the hands to clear debris from the edges. Protect your legs, feet, eyes, and hands.
  • Ouch, My Foot!

Walking barefoot can cause a real problem. One minute you are strolling barefoot, and the next, you are in terrible pain. Wounds appear more often in summer when bare feet meet glass, nails, seashells, and toothpicks.

The main problem is an infection. Swelling, drainage, and heat are signs that require quick medical attention. You might also need to update the tetanus shot.

  • Is This a Shark Fin?

You should actually worry more about sunburns than a shark. However, it just takes a few tips in order to stay safe:

You should not be in the water twilight – the sharks are more active then.

  • Stay out of the water if you are bleeding.

Avoid wearing shiny jewelry when you swim. It can look like fish scale to a shark.

Remember that shark can sometimes be near the shore. Sandbars could trap them very close to the beach at the really low tide.

  • Ocean Risks

Rip currents may pull even best swimmers out to sea. What’s out, especially if you are a surfer – shore breaks occur when waves break directly on the beach, and they could cause spinal cord injuries.

Choose a more tranquil beach with lifeguards that can tell you more about water conditions.

  • Are You Sure You Want to Consume That?

We adore a good picnic. However, not that much if the mayo sits out very long.

  1. Remember – you should keep the cold foods – cold.
  2. Do not keep foods at room temperature longer than one-two hours.
  • Grills

What is summer without outdoor food preparation? Simply follow some basic rules:

  1. Keep the grill away from branches and buildings.
  2. Do not let grease build up.
  3. Keep your kids and/or pets away.
  4. Never leave the grill unattended.
  • Brain-Eating Amoeba

Brain-eating amoeba is a very tiny organism who lives in rivers, hot springs, and lakes. It enters through the nose and could cause a rare and fatal brain infection.

You can prevent infection if you avoid swimming in warm fresh waters. If you do get in this kind of water, do not put the head under. You may also reduce the danger by wearing nose clips, mostly if you are going to jump in that may send water up your nose.

  • West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes can bother a lot! They could spread West Nile virus. Many people who get this virus have no symptoms at all. Still, truly serious and sometimes fatal illness could happen in less than one percent of people who are infected.

The only way to stay safe and prevent West Nile virus is to avoid mosquito bites. You should always wear some mosquito repellent. Moreover, if weather permits, long sleeves and long pants outside from dusk to dawn. Nowadays, other dangerous virus is Zika virus. Read the most important things you need to know about Zika virus: https://yourhealthtube.com/zika-virus-symptoms/

At your home, get rid of buckets, tire swings, and standing water in birdbaths. They are breeding grounds for mosquitos.

  • Extreme Heat

It’s so damn hot! That is not just uncomfortable, but it could also make you sick. You should take special care with the elderly and the children because their bodies do not cool as well.

Do not exercise at the hottest part of the day, wear loose clothes, and always stay hydrated. The most common symptoms of the heat-related disease may include pale moist skin, nausea, and cramps. Drink more water, go to a cooler place, and put some cool clothes on your skin. In case you aren’t getting any better or if you have more severe symptoms such as fast heart rate, high fever, dry and warm skin, change in behavior, convulsions, or confusion, call 911.

 

 

Conclusion:

Summer can bring a lot of fun, but it can also bring a lot of safety and health challenges. Summer health hazards are common all around the world, especially near water. Always use U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket on the water. Plus, you should put on wide-brimmed hat and sunscreen in order to protect your skin from the sun rays. You should also drink plenty of water, use an insect repellent, and wash the hands often.

Reference

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